Lauren Currie

bw7ym1kieaaas4q

This Friday Design Enterprise will welcome one of Scotland’s most dynamic service designers, design activists, educators and entrepreneurs. Lauren Currie graduated from DJCAD in both Product Design and our Master of Design programme. With Sarah Drummond, she established Snook, which has a world reputation as an innovative social design agency. She has been an advisor to the Chinese Government, has spoken at conferences and events throughout the world, and has a well deserved reputation as an inspiring speaker. She also writes for the Herald. In September 2014 The Observer newspaper put her on the front cover of the Review section as one of the nominated Top 50 Radicals – people who are changing Britain through social innovation.

She was recently appointed Programme Manager for MA Digital Experience Design at Hyper Island Manchester. Hyper Island is an international private university level education provider covering design, leadership, digital business and a range of other specialisms. She will be running a two hour workshop with us that promises to be a unique and valuable experience!

Here is a recent talks she has given…

 

Advertisements

Joanna Montgomery – woman of the future

CX-jyg1WAAEyadY

 

This Friday I am delighted to welcome Joanna Montgomery to Design Enterprise. This was her in the Telegraph just a few weeks ago. Joanna is the winner of: Innovator of the Year, FDM Everywoman Women in Technology Awards 2013; Lloyds TSB Enterprise Awards ‘Best Start Up’ Scotland 2012; Woman of the Future in Science and Technology Finalist 2012, NACUE National Varsity Pitch National Champion, 2011. She has been featured on BBC, CNN and The Discovery Channel, she is CEO of Little Riot, has a regular blog at Huffington Post. She is an Interaction Design graduate of DJCAD and will join us to share her insights on pitching and presenting, and being enterprising in design. She recently smashed her Kickstarter target and is bringing her product to the market.

Joanna is an internationally sought after speaker who is candidly honest about the ups and downs of entrepreneurship, Joanna’s vision and determination are inspiring. She also ranks as Great Britain’s strongest woman, and in recent heats qualified for world finals in the United States. Before she joins us please ensure you have checked her out and read at least one of her Huffington Post pieces – preferably all of them. You have a unique opportunity to ask her questions – make the most of it!

Creative futures

2014

The lecture creative futures examined how recent research has shed light on the nature of careers and employment for design graduates. The Institute for Employment Studies (IES) undertook the “largest-ever study of the career patterns of graduates from UK courses in art, design, craft and media explores graduates’ experiences of higher education, their activities since graduating, the work they are currently engaged in, and their plans for the future.” From the IES website you can download the three major reports that have come out of this study. In short, the research shows that graduates are making use of their creative education, are generally positive about their work, are increasingly pursuing portfolio working lives, and value their education. However, the research suggests that art and design graduates “had less well‐developed IT, networking and client‐facing skills”. Within the lecture we were unable to explore the detail of the research. Students are strongly advised to look at the reports, especially creative career stories.

There is little difference in terms of career patterns between students who pursue craft-based or industry-based design disciplines – both require entrepreneurial skills and involve portfolio working. The Crafts Council has commissioned research that studies the career patterns of craft graduates, which has resulted in a number of reports that can be accessed from their website. The Making Value report by Mary Schwarz and Dr Karen Yair is of particular interest. The survey and report New lives in the making by myself and Alison Cusworth was published in 1998, but shows very similar patterns of employment. The book The Independents by Charles Leadbeater and Kate Oakley published by Demos is also from the late 90s, but it has some highly relevant observations and advice for emergent creative professionals today.

Making design work

z
This summarises the content of the first of my lectures on making design work on 6 February 2015 and provides all necessary links to other research cited in the lecture.

The first lecture new challenges considered the fast pace of change in work and employment and sketched out some of the broad trends taking place. We looked at technological, economic and demographic changes which are set to transform work practices and structures. I referred to the January 2016 Future of Jobs report by the World Economic Forum. Also The Most Important Design Jobs Of The Future report in co-design.

I stressed that none of this predetermines the future. I quoted Karl Marx, who said that people “make their own history” and that there is the opportunity to shape the future ourselves. But as Marx quickly went on to explain “they do not make it just as they please, but under circumstances transmitted from the past”. Yes, we can make our own futures, but we have to understand the preconditions, constraints (but equally, opportunities) that the past gives us.

Generational developments, and the tectonic demographic shifts currently taking place – linked to an ageing population – is perhaps the most significant constraint for the future. We considered how the pre-boomers, babyboomers, generation x and generation y looked at work and identity. The characteristics of Gen Y were explored by Don Tapscott in his book Grown Up Digital. In the UK, the think tank Reform described them as the IPOD generation in their report. Notably, Gen Y is less politically engaged than other generations, which means that they are less regarded by political parties. However, the rise of student activism and protest could suggest a shift, as Laurie Penny argues.

A recent issue of Time magazine has looked at the future of work. In this issue it was argued that “Most of the best jobs will be for people who manage customers, who organize fans, who do digital community management. We’ll continue to need brilliant designers, energetic brainstormers and rigorous lab technicians.” A key argument of the Time feature, supported by other research, is that women are likely to play a far greater role in management and business. A further trend which developments this month support, is bi-generational leadership. The most successful high tech start ups in the US have leadership teams that include both Babyboomers and Gen Y. The lecture dwelt for a short time on the virtues of bi-generational leadership in Universities.

The future belongs to the T-shaped practitioner, by which specialist knowledge skills are balanced by cross-disciplinary inter-personal skills. This all comes together in our context through the Design Council’s work on multidisciplinary design education. As it explains: “Tim Brown, CEO of design firm IDEO, which has been a vocal proponent of the need for ‘T-shaped people’, describes these ideal employees as ‘specialists with a passion and empathy for people and for other subject areas’”. I finished the lecture by suggesting that increasingly we are inventing the nature of work as we do it – a bit like building planes in the sky.

Dundee Pecha Kucha night

IMG_0644

The Pecha Kucha night is a must attend event in Dundee. Part of an international network of creative discussions and presentations, the event has been critical in helping to forge a vibrant creative community in the city. Over the last two years Design Enterprise students have been regular attenders – and indeed DJCAD graduates (and some staff) are amongst the presenters.

The next one will be held towards the end of February.

We strongly encourage you to be part of this. The event is initiated and organised by Creative Dundee. We suggest that you go to their website and subscribe to their email alerts. When the tickets go on sale, they sell out within hours.